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about the rest of us? and there is a lot bween ron paul and dennis kucinich. what about the rest of us? my view is that i do not want to be involved in endless wars anymore thanhey do, but i do insist that we win wars we cannot afford to lose. now, the left and some of our libertarian friends believe we cannot afford this war and they e ready to leave. what happens if we leave and does it really matter? all of you are smart. you can aner that question probably better than i can. i can tell you what i think and that is probably why you came. if we lose i afghanistan, whatever that may be, it will matter. and what is losing? i think losing would be allowing the taliban to come back in power in portions or all of the country. i have one simple thought -- the taliban running anything is not a good idea. particularly i you happen to be a young woman and you believe in religious freedom and tolerance. but what does it really matter? their places -- there are places on the planet where women are treated horribly and we do not have one troop. so this is not just about righting wrongs that may
probably knows more about these issues than many of us combined. he will be joining us. >> the aclu and the drug policy alliance are advocating for federal legislative change. my coalition co-chair will be talking about litigation and state reforms. i am going to focus on the federal and legislative response, some of the history, and details about what i am talking about today. the aclu were some federal disenfranchisement from three angles. we litigate in court, will lobby in federal and state legislatures, and we engage in public education. as we face another important election, there are an estimated 5.3 million americans who will not be able to vote because of the result of criminal convictions. this is despite the fact that the supreme court repeatedly has said that voting is a fundamental right. most with criminal convictions are barred from the polls. 48 out of 50 states have laws that bar citizens with criminal convictions from bidding in some manner. two other states permanently in franchise criminals with felony convictions. there are 5.3 million americans who cannot vote.
college graduates by 2020. we used to be number one. we are now no. 12. we are going to get back to no. 1 by the end of the decade. that is why we're revitalizing community colleges and reforming our education system based on what works, not is -- not on what is status quo. that is why we're fighting to make permanent our new tax credit. that will mean $10 million for tuition relief for each child going to -- $10,000 for tuition relief for each child going to college. we see an america where the middle class is the bleeding heart of the economy. that is why we passed health insurance reform to stop insurance companies from jacking up your premium, then drop coverage when you are sick or have a pre-existing condition. that is why we passed financial reform, to end taxpayer bailouts. to stop on wall street banks from taking advantage of the people. we want to compete on service, on good products and good prices. that is why we are trying to make it easier for workers to pay for retirement and fighting efforts by some parties for social security, because the phone if i am president, no one i
has the impact been on the scientists now using n.i.h. funding for embryonic stem cell research in terms of the uncertainty of the future? number two, what results have been taken in a positive sense, which i know are very good for the more than $500 million already expended? and what has been the consequence of the $10 million in the stimulus package where you informally told me that it has created the tremendous excitement and a new wave of enthusiasm by researchers who had been discouraged by the failure of congress to keep the pace, which we have moved from $12 billion to $30 billion, but failure to keep the pace in funding since 2003? >> senator, thank you for the question. and let me first say how appreciative i am personally and everyone at n.i.h. is for the strong leadership you have shown over these years in your advocacy for the value of medical research, and especially because we're talking about it today for stem cell research, that has been much appreciated, and your articulation of the importance has always been right on target, as it just was here in your opening
and put natural gas to work for us. it is good for everything. it is good for the economy, employment. the atmosphere, the planet. if we do not do it, we will all be dead. in there are plenty of reasons to do it. [laughter] [applause] >> this next question will be a little sticky for you, because you are partners with -- on this project, the summer on project. you are partners with this southern company. to go we're trying to coopt the energy. -- >> we are trying to coop the energy. the seven companies in the southeast wind and solar power, the least productive part of the country. they have to bring it in from a long way away. that means we have to have a transmission system. we have to have national standards so we can go across state lines. it needs to be implemented right now and not 10 years from now. we have to use the same kind of laws that we didn' -- we have to get it done and get it done fast. i am perfectly happy to have plenty of windmills and solar panels on my land and transmission lines. i care about my country and my friends and my grandchildren more than i do about al
-- the department of defense leaders, not by the service chiefs, a process that was supposed to inform us with one that merely ratifies a politically-driven decision. we all fall or to hearing your thoughts about whether the comprehensive review should be allowed to run its course in this fashion, and what you feel about the affected could have on the united states marine corps. we also look forward to hearing your professional military advice about what policy is best for your branch of our armed services, the effectiveness and readiness of which you will be entrusted with maintaining at the highest levels if confirmed in this position. today our military continues to be engaged in combat operations, and career officers, in ceo's, and their families, are being asked to do so much. it would be a mistake to ignore the views of our troops and the military advice of the service chiefs, and for the senate to act prematurely to repeal the tariff don't ask, don't tell law for the sake of fulfilling a political promise. i look for to the testimony of general amos today, and i again thank him and his fami
. that is the measuring stick bayous. -- measuring stick i use. the second is, do they agree to term limits? i think the number one problem we have is the desire to be there forever, and that tells me it is about them and not us. term limits is a wonderful measuring stick to judge. offer a piece of paper that says, i pledge, and make them sign it. if they do sign it, they have at least one piece of paper in the future. you're not going to get term limits passed by the u.s. congress. it is not fair to generalize it, but there are exceptions. democrat and republican, so this is not partisan statements, but the fact is, too often it is about what is best for the next election and not the next generation. we are hurting america. >> newt gingrich would not make a good nominee for president because he could not make a commitment. are there other examples? >> newt gingrich's one of the smartest man i have ever met. i have served under him four -- four years in the house. i think you can make judgments about the character based on what they're alive says. -- what the alive says. >> -- the life says. when i
on for a time frame, even though the dispersant used was pre authorized, the issue that seemed to be elevated to a national response team in washington at some point, a decision was made that the epa should play a more active role, then call for. on may 20, and you advised bp to reduce the application of dispersant and provide the availability of less toxic dispersants. please help us understand your concerns and the process you went through in conjunction with the other federal agencies. the epa had more of a commanding role than anticipated than in the area contingency plan. is there some recommendation you can provide to us about what kind of guideline that we might recommend that would elevate the decision making to more routine decisions of these dispersants to these extraordinary kinds of decisions? >> thanks. i will probably end where you ended. there is a need for those kinds of guidelines. every day you make the decisions that are before you. over time, one of the things i discussed often is duke are not only looking at the decision before you that today, but also at the response. fr
, in targeted cities. we talked about how we might do that using our own media networks and also, thanks to you. we believe that, for example, that the national council of churches has made an nationals statement that calls for acceptance of muslim neighbors and have spoken out as strongly as we can about the issues you've heard today. but we have also called on state councils of churches, including for example in florida, to initiate activities in their own communities that will say no to this kind of bigotry. we are getting a response already. we hope that will continue. that was part of the meeting today. not simply to stop with the statement, although it response at the moment and must be heard, but also to carry the word of education and hope into the future by calling on local communities, our own networks, to replicate it. i want to say one other word. you've heard this from reverend cizik. christians in the west have often been responsible for the kind of and tolerant rhetoric we now hear from various places in this country-- intolerant rhetoric we now hear from various places in the co
carefully at other countries. join us essential experience, international economist could examine the origins of the banking and currency crises in some detail. they have devoted considerable research tohe international contagion of financial crises, a related topic of obvious relevance to our recent experience. finally, macroeconomic modeling must accommodate the possibility of unconventional monetary policies and number of which have been used during the crisis. earlier work on this topic relies on the example of japan, now, unfortunately, we have more data points. the experience of the united states and the united kingdom with large-scale asset purchases could be explored this is that we can understand the affect of these transactions and how they could be incorporated into modern models. i began my remarks by drawing a distinction between the scientific, engineering, and managementspects of economics. for the most part, the financial crisis reflected problems in economic engineering and economic management. this private-sector arrangements, for exame risk management and fundin
not trust us, they will not keep coming back. continue >> and a month-long look at privacy in communications policy. >> the c-span video library is a great resource to see what is happening in washington. find the most recent events covered, those most watched, and most covered -- all free. >> governor tim pawlenty is widely considered to be contemplating a presidential run in 2012. he recently sat down with c-span to talk about his plans for the future. this is just under 40 minutes. >> has there been a defining moment for you as governor of minnesota? >> probably many, but i will give you two. one is the support we have given to the men and women in a national -- national military, and the national guard. we have stepped up in unprecedented ways to support them. we lead the nation in the beyond the yellow ribbon campaign. the other thing, for minnesota, i am in stick it has been liberal through history, and for me to draw a line on driving down government spending and will be on cutting taxes is something i'm also proud of. >> the president has said that next year in july 2011, it is a tra
? to help us discuss these issues, we have invited a group of excellent panelists. these dedicated men and women are familiar with many of the current obstacles that we must overcome to ensure a timely release of diversity data. and the data becomes very important for a lot of us as we begin to assess and evaluate where that company is and what needs to be done. in reality, it's an asset when they do provide that, that we can actually help them progress and advance, and increase their revenue and relationship in the community. you have to look at it from the positive side and not just from the negative. but it actually enhances that company's growth and future if they provide that kind of data because there is a variety of organizations that can provide assistance in further enhancing the growth and development as we see the demographics of our society changing within us. to start off with as our first panelist, we have carlos orta. he has been president and chief executive officers of the has panic -- hispanic organization of corporate responsibility. it is at a level of economic comp
level. >> can over use of tbacco and alcohol create a system occurred disease -- create epistemic heart disease? if they served in vietnam and they gotta regardless of their lifestyle, it is our poblem? >> yes. we cannot parse that out. >> with respect to the rebuttal a presumption, they claim examiners in the regional officers are not making a medical opinion like that. if there is clear evidence of risk factors or heart disase, when they request the examination, it is appropriate for them to ask the clinician in light of this risk factor. is it as likely as not that the current disability is due to herbicide exposure? we will then award benets based on what the commission says para. >> it to be very difficult -- it would be very difficult for a doctor to say it was herbicide exposure. >> i do not believe so. >> it is difficult to parse o. we do know from the studies th the iom is rigorous enough for us to give weight to them. six of the studies were strong and specifically as a dividend in making the tie between herbicide exposure and epistemic heart disease. we have to make this conn
is effectively using traditional grassroots methods, that it begi in the classical sense of grass roots as a sort of a neighbor to neighbor wellspring in that way. and they were handed perhaps the spoon fed infrastructure and the funding to achieve a clear objective spiritoso the remark about the mainstream media not being aware of or being on where of reporting on the validity of the grass-roots movement, i think is a little bit disingenuous when you look at i guess a of a classical understaing of what grassroots is and how it really begins as two stepping into something and then using those methods. so that's my question if that makes sense. >> david? >> i tried to tou on that in my remarks. i don't think -- i think liberal spend a lot of time trying to thread the movement by pointing that out and conservative spend time trying to utterly deny it and neither of them is right because like i was saying, these organizations have been around for years and they were set up to do something like this. freedom works set up because they figure at some point millions of americans would to be willing to s
drag us back to 1970. >> i inkjected -- i injected history into our discussion early on. i have to at least note the two-state solution that is been part of the diplomacy in this conflict since 1937. we're now going on 73 years, and the chances that the two-state solution, in my view, is going to disappear from the lexicon in this conflict any time soon are fairly soon. with that, ladies and gentlemen, let me thank all my panelists for participating in today's event and thank all of you and all of you out in for -- out there for joining us in our discussion. [applause] >> thank you. >> search the term "mid east peace" on line at the c-span library and you will get more than ,000 transcripts including an early mike wallace interview of abba eban. it is washington and the world your way. >> president obama's address to the nation last night in about a half-hour. before that, house minority leader john boehner's speech on troop withdrawals. >> vice president joe biden will attend an exchange in military command ceremony on c-span2. after that, the financial inquigs begins a series
questions out there but the rulemaking is going to need to clarify for us. but kind is based on even where you think it's coming out today, how is it going to change what you do? >> well, specifically on the pension side because they did something that was pretty smart a couple years ago they entered into a long-duration program, where we moved more of the pension investments from equity into fixed income. and so also looking at doing more physical interest rate swap. the same is to minimize the interest rate volatility. if you want to add on additional 10 to $15 billion in interest rate depending on how legislation decides to set the initial variation margin, you may forgo doing some of that because so much capital is being set aside and entered into a hedging portfolio pictures they knew what to limit volatility. but now you're adding this cash component because you have to set aside that much working capital. honestly hopefully the look of the maybe complex securities and do other things and do more net income aware that risk is minimized and so the cache is being set aside. but for us
city bombing was about half a ton of explosions. nuclear weapons, the unit used is thousands of tons. it takes about 25 truck loads, semitrucks. there have been megaton weapons as well. think about something completely different. do not think in terms of just another explosion. the original five nuclear club was formed. it become clear they were the ones that would control the intent around the world. what if that hadn't happened or suppose we didn't understand all the things we did about notify indication. we maloufed it was possible to make explosions. that took a lost effort to do. what if it had not happened? >> it is a great sport for people not involved in relay history. if discovery hadn't been made, what would the world have been capable of doing without that? my wife hates it because i watch the history channel. there were eight wars by the time i was in middle school. eight strategic wars and vietnam for us. we new world war i left about 20 million people dead. without nuclear weapons, what is the world tapeable of doing in terms of conventional arment. think about world wa
government here in washington, d.c. >> if you think it is a federal policy to use the filibuster to block any legislation? >> i think we should do everything we can to extend the current tax rates. raising taxes on anyone, especially small business, is the wrong prescription for an ailing economy. >> the republican party has harnessed the voter sentiment. >> i think that most of the uprising that we have seen thus far we have seen in the primaries. now that we are out of the primary season, all of our candidates have to work closely with all of these americans that are newly engaged in their government. we want to encourage americans to take an active role in their government because when americans are engaged, washington listens. when the american people are not engaged, then the politicians are in charge. we have seen what that has led to. >> what impact did the primaries have? >> alito that they and other americans will stay engaged in what is happening in washington on a daily basis. if they work with their members, both democrats and republicans, they can drive the debate and they can dr
us tonight. let's get started >> it is great to be with all of you here. thank you for letting us into your home this evening. i started out like most businesses do in a small business. i typed, answered phones for a small company. my husband started out driving a pittsburgh for the city of pennsylvania. i am running for public office now because i like most of you think our country is headed in the wrong direction. frank and i are worried our two granddaughters will not have the same opportunity we had. i have created jobs. i have cut spending and solved problems. i think we need some common sense and practical problem solving. barbara boxer has been in washington, d.c. for 28 years. she may say many things to night. her track record is clear. the results of her policies are devastating for this state. in the last 20 months alone, unemployment has grown, debt has grown on its way to $20 trillion. she may say she is fighting for cal forrians. but the truth is she is fighting hardest for another six years in washington, d.c. >> it is wonderful to be here. thanks you to the good peo
of the conversations over the weekend. for us, it was less about -- and i understand all of the noise about crisis and bailout and morale hazard. lehman had the capital. we needed the liquidity. we had four -- we went into that last weekwith over $40 billion of liquidity, we lost close to 30 in three days. we needed the liquidity. i really cannot answer you, sir, as to why the federal reserve and the treasury and the sec together chose to not only provide support for liquidity, but also not to have opened the window to lehman that sunday night as it did to all of our competitors. i must tell you when i first heard about the fact that the window was open for expanded collateral, a number of my finance and treasury team came into my offense -- office and said we're fine. we have the collateral. we can pledge it. we're fine. 45 minutes later, they came back and said, that window is not open to lehman brothers. >> yes, that is in the chronology. all right. mr. baxter, let me follow up on this. in addition to the -- did you see political considerations in the timeline? you see the debate about the fina
as legal issues for that. i can tell you that something along the order of 97% of our viewers in use is within the united states and canada. >> can a united states person access aoreign craigslist site? >> anyone anywhere can access the craigslist site anywhere. >> so what is the significance of taking down the site in the united states? >> the site in the u.s. was set up as part of an arrangement with a series of attorneys general last year. i think the intent was to do a number of things, capture credit-card intermission, captor phone information. we decided on september 3 to remove that category, and again have no intention of restoring it. >> if i am in washington d.c., accessing the canadian side, can i advertise services that would be available in washington, d.c on the canadian side? >> yes, you could, but there were be simply no value whatsoever, because the individuals who view the site in montreal are living in montreal. >> how about someone in washington d.c. viewing the canadian site? >> i am not sure i understand. bixby said you could access any site from anywhere. if i
guest has been david armor. thank you for being with us this morning. that is all for "washington journal" this morning. we will be back tomorrow morning at 7:00 eastern to take your calls. have a good day. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . . çççç-our live coverageç ofe afternoon session will be here ççthe commission will hear frm people that deal with oil spills inçç alaska.% çtheçç session beginsçç at0 er(kspan. ççççççdavid axelrodçç jd ççpolitico in a decision onçe 2010 midterm elections. our look atçç privacy and communication policies by focusing onç the federalç laws that limit data collection. ç >> this was the second time that the court heard the case. earlier this year a two judge panel from the ninth circuit overturned laws because they were disproportionately affecting minorities. this is just over one hour. >> good afternoon. we are here they hear the argument [unintelligible] and we have judged gould appearing by video from seatt
country. thanks for joining us on "washington journal" and will be back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern half to take your calls. . >> happening right now on c-span 2, the impeachment trial of louisiana federal judge thomas porteus accused of taking bribes. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] senators are considering a judicial nomination before resuming debate on a small business bond. the bill includes $12 billion in tax breaks, an additional small business support for it live coverage when the senate comes in this afternoon at 2: 30 eastern. domestic manufacturing and energy efficiency, live coverage on cspan when the house gavels in tomorrow at 2:00 p.m. eastern. >> every weekend on cspan 3, experience american history. 48 hours of people and events telling the american story. here historic speeches by national leaders and eyewitness accounts by events that shaped our nations. visit museums, historical sites, and college campuses as professors and leading historians tell them to america's past. am
questions that are before us at the department. i will close their and i know we're anxious to get to questions and answers and i will defer backs the secretary. >> thank you very much. >> thank you for those presentations. i want to say that i particularly appreciate that when we invited you, mr. secretary, to talk about the arctic you want a more expansive conversation which we welcome and appreciate. among the many vigorous reforms that you have been busy implementing, the one that i particularly admire is the degree of transparency and directness in your inquiries with respect to the status and quality of voem, of its staff and resources and general capacity to perform. what we know about that enterprise depends very much on your own overside and other interior department reviews. i want to begin simply by listing the issues i hope we can get through in the next half- hour or so. i want to leave time to get into the arctic with commissioner beineke. the first test to do with the state of mms. based on the reviews from your department, it is dysfunctional. it consists of people
a recommendation -- a decision by the president and whether that would be useful at the time. >> he has not traveled much. that is because he has a full- time job. >> do you think anything has been changed with what the people in afghanistan are asking? second, china's rise of the military in the indian ocean -- >> first of all, i think the elections took place despite the fact that the taliban are trying to disrupt them. there are lower levels of violence then there were during the presidential elections last year. at the end of the day, there was still a lot of effort put in by the taliban to intimidate voters. it undoubtedly had an impact on the turnout. a higher percentage of women in this election than in the presidential election. certainly there were a lot of complaints about the election that will have to be adjudicated, but i think having held the elections, the afghans were in the lead in terms of security for the elections. i think it is an important landmark that they have had these elections and that we can now move forward and tabulate the results of the election. >> milit
.m. eastern. today, i look at u.s. policy toward iraq and we will hear from the national security adviser. live coverage begins at 2:00 p.m. eastern. later in the day, a conversation on israel's modernization -- india's modernization and what it means for their neighbors. that starts at 3:30 eastern. follow the people and events that make history on line at the cspan video library. the transfer of a canal, the impeachment of president, the events of 9/11. watch what happened as it happened all free anytime, this is washington your way. next, a speech from president obama in milwaukee, wisconsin. he spoke at the annual community festival. the event is organized by the milwaukee area labor council of the afl-cio. the president's remarks are about 40 minutes. >> hello, willkie. hello, of milwaukee. thank you. it is good to be back in milwaukee. it is good to be back. i am almost come. [applause] i just hop onto 94 and i am home. [applause] i will take it all the way to the south side. it is good to to be here on such a beautiful day. happy labor day, everybody. [applause] i want to say thank
for afghanistan. whenever you do a strategic plan, used her with a list of planning assumptions. if any of the internet to be wrong -- when every do a strategic plan, you start out with a list of planning assumptions. if any of them turn out to be wrong, then you have a problem. they looked at the afghan presidential election and started rethinking whether or not we had a credible partner that we could work with, by, and threw in afghanistan. if you look at the way we americans look at counterinsurgency, we are a lot from the british and different experiences of the 20th-century. -- the british and french experiences of the 20th-century. the british and northern -- the british in northern ireland, they thought they were in their own turf. by the same token, the french in algeria, the french considered algeria part of metropolitan france. it was non-negotiable. when the conflict began, algeria was a part of france. that was not from the perspective of the fln. that informed the way they thought about the conflict. you kind of assume that your interests will line up with the host governme
him lessons that then he goes on to use to great effect later. host: political oper tunist? guest: yes. host: yoo license is s. grant? guest: he is considered one of the highest oper tunists and because of that he gets thrown out, because he really didn't have any political experience before he became president. so is his breath number, the number of positions he eserved end up way outside the norm. host: harry trueman. guest: trueman is one of those interesting things. as i recall, i would have to go back and look at my data. but as i recall he is actually an oper tunist, but it's because he served sort of short term in many of his underlying positions. host: barack obama. guest: he is officially not. but there was one from the 2008 election that actually had one of the highest scores. certainly higher than president clinton. host: why? guest: because he had run for more offices in a short period of time, where as senator clinton, at the time i counted her first lady experience as essentially one position, eight years. so that essentially disadvantages her. host: with barack obama, di
needed that becomes too big to fail. the bill doesn't give us the authority but it does give us the authority if we despair of these other methods that we believe the firm in size and complexity is dangerous we have both of the living will requirement but also the authority regulators collectively to break up firms. i don't know the answer to that question. that is the charge congress has been -- given the regulators and we take seriously that charge. we put in place some reasonable approaches, but i appreciate your historical perspective which says over the long run you have to take into account the political influence of these large institutions. >> in terms of the will of the institutions themselves, there is a division in american industry. some industries have adopted levels of self regulation, in depth, an acceptable behavior for instance nuclear power industry has developed impressive processes. best practice and enforcement, on the other hand. they had just seen one of the manifestations. the financial community or nuclear power industry or more like deepwater drilling.
impressions. they get impressions like a large percentage of rigs are false. when the fbi tells us that, it is not true. they say dna does not matter was the attacker was a stranger or we have a suspect identified. in fact, having dna evidence in and is crucial for any prosecution of these days. juries expect it. a corporate the victims' stories. it establishes patterns of a serial rapist. the data we have is insufficient for our needs and impede our ability to report and why so few rapists and up in prison. we would like to see the department of justice track rate cases from initial reports all the way through ultimate disposition. based on what we know, there are a few things congress can do now. they can first past the act passed in the house which would create a national registry of forensic evidence for sexual attack cases. it would provide crucial information and open up data to the media so that we can have investigative reports to help us see what is going on elsewhere. it would allow us to track raids by jurisdiction. --rapes by jurisdiction. we could incorporate the registrati
of employees. it was the private pension rewards for long working used to regulate the labor markets. the retirement age, the existence of retirement age in our society is a function of decisions both of increased productivity in the last century and decisions we made about allocating leisure. much of the leisure we chose to take from the increase productivity went into shorter work weeks. it also went to longer vacations in the last century before the 1950's. after the 1940's or so, to be increased leisure went into retirement, a period of non work. we created this institution. it is malleable to some extent for it is also terribly important. the early retirement story is interesting. it begins to some extent with the unions very successfully negotiating 30-year and out early retirement options. many of the unions that had defined benefits and many of the businesses agreed to early retirement provisions that serve the purpose on the one hand of rewarding workers for long-term service and two, turning over the labor force. the flip side of all retirement age policy is also employment
to use that power. you ally have to be authoritarian in that croor. most jurors are coming into your courtroom having watched things on television or in the movies that is still not the real thing. it's important to take them step by step in the process, especially in important cases. the other thing i tell jurors is i refer to hamlet. even in a capital case there may be moment when something happened that it's funny. and it happened to the moussaoui case. with the human enterprise trial. remember in hamlet, there is comic relief. it doesn't mean the whole play isn't a tragedy. if this means this is a human enterprise where people laugh. you try to set the tone for the jurors. they really understand what we in the courtroom are going to be hearing together. and so i think even if the president thinks the outcome is a done deal, it isn't if we set the right tone in the courtroom. >> i would say if you were appointed defense lawyer in the case you would do everything you can to get that in front of the jury buzz of the fruche dangerousness of the defendant. rob and i were talking about
it first but am getting used to it. filthth we're taking steps to reduce the number of o.s.d. level reviews to those necessary to support major investment decisions or to uncover and respond to significant program execution issues. eliminating low value added statutory processes and i hasten to say at this point i'm not referring to weapons acquisitions reform act that we understand the intent of that and appreciate that intent and are executing to that intent including developmental test and evaluation and systems engineering. the kind of thing i have in mind is this, i sit in there in the pentagon on saturday afternoon reading reports to you that are this thick and in an embarrassing number of circumstances late to need. and am convinced i'm the only human being that ever read it, never will and the reason i'm reading is because i have to sign it and am afraid of embarrassing myself. i sign an equal number of letters to you in which i say you ask for it in may and it's june and it has nothing to do with intent but execution and the paperwork burden we've imposed upon ourselves. that's jus
it completely right. the problem is not islam. the problem are people who have used islam to commit violent acts against our country and our people but what happened after we asked all these questions was a cottage industry who actually had an ax to grind against muslims and against arabs in particular, they ended up providing most of the answers. they wrote books and got them published. they testified before congress and dominateded the air waves on radio and television. i will never forget a hearing held in the senate on islam featuring three guys who -- actually if you had the reverse and the three muslims were testifying on the nature of judaism in an arab country, you would hear whoops and yells. but it was acceptable for this to happen. and the lies they told and the bigotry they spread were horrific. and yet people were nodding in the audience because that's all they heard. that's all they were in a position to hear. these guys inflated every incidents of violence as somehow evidence they were right, and they have done damage. shortly after 9/11 when we polled america, what we found was p
for us is trying to get our six-party friends led by china to work with us to try to convince who's ever in leadership in north korea that their future would be far better served by denuclearizing, and that remains our goal. >> as always, thank you so much. [laughter] for coming here, first of all, but also giving such a thorough and complete and comprehensive talk about american foreign policy. and i know i speak for everyone that we wish you godspeed and more in your work next week and >> on c-span tonight, president obama talks about the economy during a visit to the ohio. jo bonner holds a town hall meeting in his district. the democratic national committee holds a -- an event in philadelphia. former gov. george pataki focuses on health care. >> at long last, the united states of america joins every other nation in the world to say that health care is a right, not a privilege. >> we have been covering town hall meetings. what's them on line at the c- span a video library. they are searchable and free on your computer any time. the c-span networks -- we provide coverage of politics, p
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